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kicks off his second term with a call for national unity. >> a regional election in germany, a wakeup call for the chancellor. >> and extreme winter weather halts travel across much of northern europe. >> we start this show in washington where president obama balm has publicly taken the oath of office for his second term. he had to take it twice. >> official ceremony held in private on sunday at the white house. now the ceremonial swearing in in front of more than 700,000 people that showed up. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries deman
justice, distinguished justices of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor christine gregoire, and my fellow washingtonians. this we know,our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the uncertainty, we see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that haswe are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things, one. with our uniquely powerfu
'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. and we've got to understand that. second of all, we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows. >> i want to bring in "new york times" columnist nick chrisoff and jackie kucinich. is this time different? you were looking at the full screen earlier there. you have a bipartisan group. big hitters in there. schumer, mccain, rubio.menendez. it feels to me as if a month of sundays may have just hit the calendar. the stars are aligning. it does feel different. whether it's going to be enough i don't know. i think republicans have really been sobered by the last election results. i think they feel they have to do something. seeing leadership from people like marco rubio i think really does give a lot of republicans who might have doubts otherwise a real chance to think again. >> the credibility, the aura, the halo that may be needed here. jackie, those eight senators
. with the nothing in the 2012 national election behind them, and the risk of demographic doom at the hands of surging minority groups growing every day the g.o.p. is making an all-out effort to reboot the whole brand. last night luis boy governor bobby jindal had this advice for his party at the republican national committee's winter meeting in charlotte, north carolina. >> we got to stop being the stupid party. i'm serious. it's time for the new republican party that talks like adults. it's time for us to articulate our plans and visions for america in real terms. it's no secret that we had a number of republicans that damaged the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. i'm here to say we've had enough of that. >> john: just how the party plans to keep four todd akin and richard mourdock's from disgorging off-hand comments on legitimate rape and rape-born children as something god intend intended remains to be seen. but reince priebus the g.o.p. chair has vision of a renewed republican party. we can renewt americans around our values if we can prove we can take them to a bet
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
mean, in the weeks after the election, he drew some very clear lines on fiscal cliff, for example. i mean he said, tax rates on wealthy individuals had have to go up. that's a firmer way of approaching these then he sometimes did in the past. >> dan, one of the things that was very different from his first speech is that this speech he didn't appear to talk to republicans. and nor did he reach out to the middle. when we talk about that it was a very -- had a lot of progressive elements in it, they were applause lines that seemed directed right at core democratic constituencies. so who do you think his target audience was? is the country behind him now or is it once again he's just solidified the same base we've come to know the last four years? >> i think he's concluded, and i think it's a fair conclusion, there are voters in this country who will not be with him. years ago or seven or eight years ago, we talked about how democrats were looking for ways to win over rural america. this speech that he gave is an indication that he's not looking to try to win over rural america. there a
of the tea party caucus. the president won an election that many say he shouldn't have won given the sluggish recovery. he beat your party. democrats beat a bit more in the senate. do you feel republicans need to change in the second obama term? >> i think a few of them are, john, and i'm certainly not. those of us who won an election, we see our constituents as deserving the best representation we can give them. we won elections too. this is an interesting day today, this peaceful transfer, a constitutional way of the power and vision by our founding fathers, and they understood the separation of powers. they knew there was going to be a clash in the confrontation and a struggle between the parties, but we also know we have to run this government. it's going to be interesting as this unfolds. this should be a healing day. then tomorrow morning, we can start that harder work you mentioned. >> reporter: let's talk about the harder work. some of it divides your party internally. other parts divide his party internally. there's been a talk that maybe immigration reform is a place there could be
think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right word. he won the election. he won it fair and square, to doubt about that, but i think there's been a tone of almost like an imperious tone the last few times. i'm not saying it will guarantee results if he's more outreach and republicans respond. i think he should try it. even independent voters have told me they thought the news conference last week was had too much arrogance and some of his tone. having said that, listen, he had some scars from the last four years. i guess he wants to get a little revenge. i think if he wants to make progress, he should try at least -- >> give him some advice. health care was the big first initiative or the stimulus program and health care, issues on which the republicans wanted no part of what the president wanted. and a lot of republicans say it poisoned the waters. when you look at the agenda now, there's the economy, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the bu
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
the election season. he went on at a time of deficits being front and center to talk about debt and deficits on capitol hill. he was very aggressive defending entitlement such as social security and medicare and medicaid. in this address, the president signals he believes he has a mandate. he will be aggressive about pushing change in the second term. >>shepard: some of the change, can you make the argument it could happen? republicans are coming around on immigration issues. the polls suggest gay rights issue is taking a turn, as well, right? >>reporter: no question. he was able to pass the health care bill in the first term. the second term, in part, will be about implementing that law that republicans opposed but, obviously, chief justice roberts was the justice that helped decide that, in fact, it is the law of the land. the president, we should note, suggested he is going to reach out to republicans. he started the day at st. john's church across lafayette park, a little prayer service, and the pastor talked about how the pastor in chief in recent days in places like newtown, connecticu
about whether or not you're in favor of term limits for all elected officials. termresident already has limits. your governors, senators, mayors, city council, dog catcher, tax collector. are you in favor of term limits, yes or no? here are the numbers. host: you can also reach out to us by social media. host: i want to show you some of the numbers from the recently released gallup poll. they ask americans support for establishing term limits for federal lawmakers. suppose on election day you could vote for key issues as well as candidates. or againstote for the number of terms congress and senate can serve? nationally among adults those voting for term limits are in the 75% range. those who say they would vote against term limits, 21%. those who had no opinion, 5%. breaking it down among political parties, republicans, those voting for, who say they would vote for term limits, 82% of republicans questioned in this gallup poll, 82% say they would vote for term limits. 15% say they would vote against. 3% say they have no opinion. independence, 79% say they would vote for term limits. 17%
for its two-time elected democratic president, to say nothing of the first african-american president, it brings together all of the best about this country. >> jennifer: you can see where they're playing from. they just had a shot of actually -- actually from inside the view of a tuba. they had a shot of them, they're up on the platform which is elevated, right. overlooking the mall. so it is a beautiful spot for them to be. right above them is where the president will take the oath. that's where all of the elected officials are seated, where they're seated as well. marine band will be playing for quite awhile here. almost an hour of the lead up to the inauguration. >> it is an aaron sorkin kind of day. west wing kind of day. a day where ritual and politics becomes an important part of keeping the democratic tradition alive. as someone who sometimes sat on the cynical side of things. clearly, it is a representation of the imperial presidency. >> jennifer: we're seeing dick durbin walking right now into the steps, as he's going up, he was obviously a lead player in so much of the putt
the about was re-elected so we don't have to worry about the supreme court being distorted. i do think that's the case. you know over the last couple of years, we've seen state after state introduce restrictions on a woman's right for access. so the law is in place but the states can deny access and then you have some states where there's only one clinic in the entire state that provides the service. >> john: exactly. so what do you say to your constituents who might be opposed to abortion rights who maintain that it's their right because of their beliefs be it religious or otherwise to do everything they can to chip away at these rights of women? >> well, you know, i really find it to be contradictory because the same people who are against choice also say that they are opposed to government interventions and they want government to be small. but yet they want to give government the authority to determine what a woman does with her body and to tell a doctor what a doctor does in an exam room. to me, if you were constent and you were against abortion, then why don't you provide ready access
progress in the last election. >> john: here is a comment from the present that should resonate with any remaining mitt romney fans. >> obama: we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the view. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare, and medicaid, and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> john: david, that couldn't have been more pointed if he turned to paul ryan and said that line directly to him. do you think he was sending a message across the bell? >> i hope he's sending a message. a lot of progressives look at that and say wait a second, is that the same president who was willing to support the change in social security, or is he going to stand firm. the rhetoric sounds good but how does the president act? what a
in the november election. republican members are hunkered down at the annual winter meeting in north carolina. they reelected the committee chairman. the talk is extremely harsh at times with one prominent republican leader using the word stupid to describe the way he said the party has been behaving. let's bring in the political director on the scene for us. he is joining us with the latest information. pretty harsh words over there. >> yeah, there is. look, wolf, the republicans have come to grips with the results of the election. they did not win back the white house. they lost in the house of representatives and of course democrats remained in control of the united states senate. a lot of soul searching over the past couple of days for members of the republican national committee. these are the grass roots activists who come all across the country who make up the republican party. as you said, harsh words from the louisiana governor, bobby jindal who had to say this last night. >> we have got to stop being stupid. it's time for a new republican party that talks like it does. articulate ou
's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. john podhoretz -- >> podhoretz -- >> john podhoretz, you wrote a book a few years back called "bush co
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
has netanyahu lost steam? >> this is a very interesting revolution. there's no doubt but this election, in fact with the defeat for netanyahu. >> meaning what? he won the election. >> he may be the next prime minister. his party went down. >> who, yahir? >> no, netanyahu's own party went down from 42 seats to 31 seats. so his party had fewer seats. this guy came out of nowhere. his first time running for office. he got 19 seats. he became the most -- the second most important party in -- out of nowhere. so he has become the star of this thing. and netanyahu is going to have to make a deal with him. all of the politicians are splintered but it's never been like this. now netanyahu is going to have to move, if i may say so, this is now a center right. it is going to be much more pragmatic and open. >> how long is his term? >> five years, isn't it? >> it can be as much as five years but it almost never lasts five years because the coalition breaks up. >> how long do you think he will be prime minister? >> i think the next three years at least. >> what happened to ohlmert? >> in my judgmen
tester is glad to be in this parade. he got re-elected. >> after a tough battle, that's for sure. >> this is the wind river dancers, the wind river reservation all the way from wyoming. they are here to honor all of us with their performance. $6,000 short of their scaled-down fundraising. they are marching anyway and doing an excellent, excellent job. right now i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer here in washington, d.c. we're right across from the president of the united states on the reviewing stand. there it is, the reviewing stand on the north lawn of the white house. kate bolduan is here, jim acosta is here and we're in "the situation room," a special edition of the situation room watching the wind river dancers from the wind river reservation in wyoming performing for the president of the united states. he's still there. he's still in the reviewing stand. the first lady, sasha and malia have gone inside. i suspect they have to get ready for the balls for tonight. >> it's a very special day, obviously, but a very long day
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
that harry reid almost didn't win re-election. >> they need to change the intensity to get people who support gun control to actually start voting, to have them care enough about it that they will actually vote on it. >> considering joe biden, susan, has been leading the charge on gun control, i want to play one more clip from his google chat. he was asked if an assault weapons ban would -- >> a shotgun will keep you a lot safer. a double barrel shotgun than the assault weapons in somebody's hands who doesn't know how to use it. even one who does know how to use it. you know. it's harder to use an assault weapon and hit something than it is a shotgun. you want to keep people away in an earthquake, buy some shotgun shells. >> this seems to be part of the strategy. sort of common sense. also things like we've heard supporters say you don't need an assault rifle to shoot a duck. you need 30 shots from a magazine to kill a deer you probably shouldn't be out there hunting. what's the messaging and how important is the messaging? >> the messaging is important and we certainly see vice president bid
there. >> one interpretation of the election is that fracking cost mitt romney the presenthe presi. it really did make a significant difference in what turned out to be swing states. >> it did. >> and not think oklahoma was in place. -- i do not think oklahoma was in place. [laughter] >> our company has doubled the size of our employment base there. we are not huge employers yet. 750 people. that is double what we were three years ago. >> one of the environmental challenges, people worry about what you put down the wells in fracking, but it is mostly water and sand. the problem is what comes up. there is naturally occurring radioactive material down there. there is our sncc, barry m.. -- arsenic, barium. in the early days they would turn the water over to the municipal water authorities, who would water it down until they got down to the legal toxicity levels, and then dump it. the problem was, what do we do with all this waste water. they have decided, let's not a bit. they figured out ways to fill the water -- dum pit. they figured out ways to filter the water. >> that was someth
as conservatives to look at the november election and that exhult -- exultant, unabashed embrace of the left and to have a moment's despair. let me say this room is critical to preventing that to happen. "national review" has a lornings -- long, long history of standing athwart history and yelling "halt." we can stop this. we can turn it around and in fact i am right now incredibly, incredibly optimistic, as they say, it's always darkest before the dawn, that we are on the verge of a rebirth of conservativism. [applause] so what do we do? how do we make that happen? let me talk at two different levels. short-term and long term. short term let's talk about tactics on the ground. in washington, d.c. we have a president who's feeling his oats. he's reading his press releases and believes he is unstoppable. we have a democratic senate that are feeling their oats. they've read the kool-aid. let me give three bits of advice. and by the way, read the kool-aid would be just mangling, reading the press releases, drinking the kool-aid -- if they read the kool-aid it doesn't work nearly as well -- [lau
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
the inauguration i wondered, did we elected king? america's first inauguration. john adams suggested george washington be called his most benign. fortunately congress insisted on a more mesest title. people cheering the president. acting like he would make everything better. >> climate change. >> what do you think the next four years will be like? >> i think it's going to get better. john: what will president obama do about immigration? >> and discernible. john: marijuana. >> i expect the federal government to come in. john: that is our show tonight. >> and now john stossel. ♪ john: to was that guy? anyway, this monday our nation's capital looked like a marquee when a new king is ground. thousands of plot, a cheer. many act like subjects worshiping nobility. economic troubles, why all the pomp? watching, i wondered, should our capital be called imperial washington? maybe ago to far. senator john barrasso attended the inauguration joining us from washington. my imperial washington seems to be a minority opinion. in my being unfair? >> i have been to every inauguration since i was in my dad
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
they're worried about their elections. i think that in the center of the country and the red states where these senators are running, they don't think that the president's message works, and they're going to try to move themselves away from that because they're worried about it. they're worried about all these -- >> we're talking about the majority of the country though. if the majority is with the president, is he too liberal? that's what i'm asking. can you call the guy too left when he's right where the middle is? how can you keep saying that? it's the only question i want to put to you. if more than 50% support equality of marriage, more than 50% support a woman's right to choose, if more than 50% are with him on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example,
have a president who has been re-elected who knows this will be the last time he or she will ever do this, and they typically have something on their minds they want to say and they figure they're going to take the moment to do it, but by and large they're all better served if they can keep these things shorter rather than longer. >> don, did you write a short one for clinton's second inaugural? >> president clinton's second inaugural was longer than his first. it didn't stretch on and on, but i think we would have liked -- >> was that his fault or your fault? >> no comment, no comment. we would have liked to have been able to have another day for another edit, but it was a good speech, and, again, you know, they have something to say. president clinton in that case was talking about the 21st century and the millennium that we were moving towards and how he wanted america to come back together. he invoked scripture to talk about being the repairer of the breach. he wanted americans to really pull together during a time of great opportunity. >> and, of course, that was what was really
against it and see it as extremely counterproductive. my hope is that, you know, there were just elections yesterday. we don't know what kind of government will be formed or where they will go, but my prayer is that perhaps this can be a moment where we can renew some kind of effort to get the parties into a discussion to have a different track than we have been on over the course of the last couple of years. and i would like to reserve all of the capacity to be able to do that, so i'm just going to stop with what i've said, but unilateral efforts are not helpful. we oppose them coming and we -- i don't think symbolic or other kinds of efforts are what we need. we need real negotiation, we need real results, we need progress. saxby three. two weeks ago some of us returned from afghanistan seeing the operations there. you described well i think in your opening statement about the progress being made to the afghan security forces to take over. if we take back and look at iraq for a minute, some of us traveled there in a couple of years before that conflict ended, and we saw some of the build
elections. when they're not winning elections, what are they going to do? they're either going to try to reach out to voters by having more progressive policies or they're going to try to cheat. it looks like they're going hard for the cheating. bobby jindal, of course, we'll be talking to rude pundit in a minute. he went before the rnc last week. had a blunt message for his fellow conservatives. he said we have to stop being the stupid party. >> good for him. >> john: we've had enough of that. you're right jacki. however, is bobby jindal the messenger for that? because he said we have the offensive and bizarre comments. he's talking about mourdock and akin. the guys opposed to abortion even in case of rape and incest. guess where jindal stands? he's saying it is okay to have the views, just don't say them out loud. >> which doesn't serve the republican party very well. >> john: it doesn't. bobby jindal calling the rest of them stupid. he once wrote in the objection fert review about how he participated in a friend's exorcism. he was opposed to t.a.r.p. and took payments anyway. >> i
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
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